Canadian Ten Cent Varieties


This page shows the major die varieties since Canadian coins were introduced in 1858. It does NOT cover "die blunders", where dies were re-punched with different years (and the previous number is visible below the current number), or where cracks appeared in the dies causing unwanted lines to appear in the coin. It also does not cover date doubling or special coins created for the collector market. All of the coin designs displayed here were manufactured for general circulation as legal tender.

NOTE: Click on any photo to load a much larger version of the same photo

Article Index
 


1858 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1870 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1871H 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1886 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1887 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1891 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1892 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1893 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1894 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1899 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1900 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1908 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1909 10 Cent Canadian Coin Variety Identification
Click here to download a PDF copy

Click the image below to view a full screen version, then click again to view a full SIZED version:



1936 Reverse Varieties

1936 Bar:
At some point in the production run of 1936 10 cent coins a die crack appeared at the bottom of the reverse die. The most obvious evidence of the die crack is a bar that connects the left and right sides of the wreath at the bottom.

1936 Dot:
Early in 1937 while the Royal Canadian Mint was waiting for the 1937 George VI dies, an emergency supply of 10 cent coins were produced using modified 1936 dies.
A small dot was added below the bow at the bottom of the design.
Most of the 1936 Dot coins were returned to be melted down once the new dies were received, so only 5 coins are known to exist.





1947 Maple Leaf Reverse
In 1948, India was granted independance from the British Empire. Because of this, the words "ET IND IMP" (And Emperor of India) had to be removed from all obverse coin dies.
There was a demand for new 1948 coins, but delays in the manufacture of the updated dies forced the Mint into a second production run using the 1947 dies. To differentiate regular 1947 coins from the second production run a small maple leaf was engraved to the right of the date on the reverse dies:




1953 Obverse Varieties
The standard (intended) version of this obverse is the "Shoulder Fold" variety.

Because of die polishing a variant exists in 1953 coins where the shoulder strap cannot be easily seen. This variant is referred to as "No Shoulder Fold".

One other difference between the two varieties is the flaring on the letters. The No Shoulder Fold variety has much more pronounced flaring on the letters.





1968 Varieties




1969 Reverse Varieties
Early in the 1969 production year it was discovered that the Bluenose reverse die had deteriorated significantly, and was of no further use.
A completely new die was manufactured, and was used for the vast majority of the year's production. To this date only fifteen known examples of the Large Date Large Schooner coin exist.

It is quite easy to tell the difference. The numbers in the date are much more rounded and are larger than the small date version.
There is also great deal more detail in the image of the Bluenose ship.





1980 Reverse Varieties
Two reverse dies were used in the production of 1980 10 cent coins.
The differences between the "Wide 0" and "Narrow 0" varieties are described below:





2007 Obverse and Reverse Varieties
Two die designs were used in the production of 2007 10 cent coins:

Straight 7 (large logo) coins were minted for circulation and proof sets:

Curved 7 (small logo) coins were minted for insertion into Uncirculated and Specimen sets:

Return to Articles list
Return to Coin Club Home Page